Dan Lopata

Live, Love, Listen

Archive for the category “Books”

Training Plans – The Trail to MMT100

So I’m supposed to be writing a training plan for Amy for a 50k that we are looking at doing in April, but instead, I’m starting this blog post. I am pretty good at writing plans, provided I have the correct information in hand. So what is needed to write a plan?

  • Distance or time of goal race
  • How long until race day?
  • Athlete’s history and current fitness (what is the longest they have run and how recently have they run it. How long did they work up to this distance, and how much time off had they had?)
  • Athlete’s time commitment, i.e., how many times per week to run/ workout
    • Athlete’s schedule (are there days of the week they absolutely cannot run because of work/family etc)
  • A variety of cookie cutter plans of which there are plethora of on the interwebs to draw ideas from.

 My standard approach for ultras is long runs on the weekends, building up to back to backs, short runs just to stay loose during the week, and step back weeks every three weeks or so.

Most of the cookie cutter plans you find on the internet or in Relentless Forward Progress (my go to book for training) tend to be super high mileage plans. While this is good for people whose only job is to run and who don’t have kids, for the rest of us Ain’t nobody got time for that! (Unless you’re Mary Eggers!) So when those plans start expanding mileage midweek, I usually don’t. Those runs are just to keep the body loose, unless you’re doing speed or hill workouts, which those should only be once a week. I also like to incorporate strength training in people’s schedules in the form of pilates or yoga classes, and yes I’m a hypocrite because I don’t do them.

So I will give you a sample of what Amy’s training schedule looks like for Iron Master’s Challenge 50K (her longest run to date is 30K)

For Amy’s plan she wanted to look at 4 runs per week and some extra stuff with options for indoor training. She also wanted some back to back runs and 2-3 20 milers in the plan. I decided that working with Hal Higdon’s Intermediate Marathon Training Program combined with Relentless Forward Progress’ 50K at 50 miles/wk program would give me the info I wanted. Now Higdon’s Plan is an 18 week program and Bryon Powell’s is a 24 week program, so I need to alter some stuff given that Amy has 20 weeks until race day. Why did I go with these plans? Higdon’s has lower mileage during the week, but I like how Powell structures long runs and back to backs on the weekends. So here’s how it lays out:

Amy's training plan

This plan is much more in line with Higdon’s and has Amy focusing on strength because of her IT issues and 4 big weekends. Now, for me, these types of training plans are basically suggestions. We run because we like it, and want to see what we can do; we don’t run to torture ourselves. Last year I was really fatigued during my training for Cayuga Trails 50 and so I logged a 2 mile week. It was exactly what I needed. I also worked with someone who would beat themselves up every time they missed mileage on their long run… that is a recipe for disaster.

If the plan isn’t working and you find yourself hating the idea of running RE-EVALUATE the plan, maybe even re-evaluate your goal. Re-examine your motives; is your goal for going long because you think that’s the way to get respect among your fellow runners? Are you doing it because you want to prove to yourself that it’s possible regardless of injury history and prior training? Or are you doing it because you ENJOY going long, ENJOY the challenge, ENJOY long times of solitude? Remember, we GET to do this, we CHOOSE to do this, it is NOT a requirement, so if there is no joy, why bother? Find the activity/distance/plan/races that bring you joy and pursue them.

This is not to say if you enjoy doing this, that there won’t be days of training that are major slugfests just to get through.

Joy ≠ Easy.

Strindberg

Some of the other things you will notice are substitute ideas for training. We are both training through the winter which is not always easy, and mileage numbers can skew the idea of effort. That said, we are getting a 3 month membership (groupon deal) at our JCC, which has ellipticals, stairmasters (which are great for simulating many of the climbs we will encounter), an indoor track, and a pool. The idea through the week is the keep the engine and mechanics loose while the specific training for the long run and the course are found in the weekends. Furthermore, we are exploring the idea of snowshoeing this winter which is an amazing workout and great strength builder.

Stairmaster_Steppers

How to climb Massanutten Mountain inside

My plan is a bit more aggressive. I started the cycle last week and it continues for 6 months. I relied on Relentless Forward Progress for my plan. I combined the 100 mile training on 50 miles/wk with the 100 mile training on 70 miles/wk. I’m using the midweek mileage from the 50/wk plan with the weekend mileage from the 70/wk plan. My biggest week ends up being 61 miles. Again, as the plan is merely a suggestion, I will most likely drop some midweek runs or mess with the mileage depending on who I’m running with. I have also incorporated a Time ON Feet (TOF) range for my long runs in case I’m out in deep snow or snowshoeing. The formula I used was taking the mileage and multiplying it be 10 min/mile for my fast range and 14 min/mile for my slow range as I believe this is probably the pace range I will be covering during MMT100. For example a day that I have 20 miles scheduled, like January 17th, there may be a ton of snow, so if I go snowshoeing I have worked out that I should be out there between 3 hours 20 minutes (10 min/mile) – 4 hours 40 minutes (14 min/mile). I can guarantee, even at the high range I would not cover 20 miles on snowshoes, but a 20 mile running effort will be achieved.

So how could I enhance my training without increasing mileage? Here’s where I will say,

“do what I say, not what I do”:

  • I would examine my diet and eat better.
  • I would get a coach
  • I would focus on speed / tempo / hill runs on Thursdays (which I do to a low degree)
  • I would incorporate Yoga/Pilates/Strength into my schedule

Why don’t I do these things? First, for my goals I can’t justify the cost of hiring a coach. Second, at the present time the JOY of eating what I eat is greater than the deficit it creates in my running. Third, I do some speed/hill work but not to the extent that it burns me out.

My objective is JOY, I will never again win an ultra (yes I did once… kind of), but I enjoy going long. I will do what is necessary to capture that joy, and I will drop whatever destroys that joy. Training is not my job, it is my pleasure.

BTW, after virtually 8 weeks off of running because of my rolled ankle, I knocked out a nice 34 mile week for my first week of training for MMT! Felt slow and out of shape, but felt like a runner, and I have 6 months to get in shape! This is JOY!

I’m not down

I’m hurting. I’m in debt, my kids unknowingly conspire against me because of expectations set up by my ex, I’m doing work (and it’s completely transactional relationship built) and I’m paying to do it, It’s hard to see the good right now… but I’ll try (disclaimer: I feel like a used car salesman selling myself a lemon when I do these):

  • I am running – niggle in the ankle aside I’m running okay and believe I will be in prime shape for June
  • I’m engaged in meaningful spiritual stuff – I’ve been selected to be part of the lay ministry at First U and for leadership development (even though I’m an atheist) . I meet with my sponsor for alcoholism recovery weekly and almost weekly I’m working with another recovering drunk (who is not an atheist, AT ALL)
  • I am playing music –maybe not what I want all the time, but I am playing and sharing that gift with others
  • My wife is friggin’ awesome
  • I was able to contribute $5 for a present (entry into Cayuga Trails 50) for a local runner who just lost his job, and recently got engaged – the trailrunning/ultra community in Rochester is just awesome
  • I’m writing right now
  • My Buddhist Book Club meets tomorrow – Happiness by Mathieu Ricard
  • Last night, when my anger toward my ex was compounded, and I was seething, I was able to go downstairs and just sit for about 15 minutes – unfortunately one of the cats then thought she should scream at me for the entire 15 minutes.

The title of the Blog is Live, Love, Listen

Living does not mean it’s going to be easy or always pleasant, it sometimes means fulfilling obligations when they need to be met.

Loving right now means picking myself up and remaining in community with my wife, kids, and assorted communities.

Listening, well 15 minutes last night listening to the cat scream was actually better than 15 minutes listening to my thoughts run.

Parallels and Paradoxes (review)

Parallels and Paradoxes

(a review)

 Every society has conflicts in it between justice and injustice, ignorance and knowledge, freedom and oppression. The point is not simply to belong to one side or the other because one is told to, but to choose carefully and to make judgments that render what is just and due to every aspect of the situation. The purpose of education is not to accumulate facts or memorize the “correct” answer, but rather to learn how to think critically for oneself

-Edward W. Said from the article Barenboim and the Wagner Taboo reprinted in Parallels and Paradoxes p. 182

Patriotism can flourish only where racism and nationalism are given no quarter. We should never mistake patriotism for nationalism. A patriot is one who loves his homeland. A nationalist is one who scorns the homelands of others.

-Daniel Barenboim from the article Germans, Jews, and Music reprinted in Parallels and Paradoxes p.172

ParallelsParadoxes

Parallels and Paradoxes is a book that was on a reading list for a class I never got to take while in Graduate School at SUNY UB. I finally got back to read it and was blown away. Expecting the book to be purely about music and the discourses and polemic between great German composers of the past I was surprised and happy to discover a polemic between two contemporaries regarding the great composers. A particular focus was Beethoven and Wagner, and they used this discussion as a springboard for more contemporary issues including those dealing with complexities in Palestinian, Israeli, and Germanic thought and then expanding this toward a discourse on more global issues. I say contemporary, but in hindsight, I realize that the contemporary is rooted in history, a point not lost on these two gentleman.

The book, with the exception of two essays at the end, is a transcription of dialogues between the noted conductor and pianist Daniel Barenboim and intellectual/author Edward W. Said.

Barenboim is Russian Jew born in Argentina, immigrated to Israel in 1947 has lived in London, Paris, Jerusalem, Chicago and currently in Berlin residing as conductor of the Staatskapelle Orchestra. He was the first conductor to break the unwritten ban on performing Wagner in Israel and did it while touring with the Staatskapelle. He has conducted the entire Wagner Ring Cycle in Bayreuth where Wagner’s grandson still controls the music festival.

Said was born into a  Palestinian in Jerusalem, and raised in Cairo when he was removed from his birthplace. He was a Christian Arab, and because of being a Christian in a predominantly Muslim community he became displaced again to become a U.S. citizen. He was an intellectual and great commentator on culture’s relationship to society. He pioneered the field of study examining questions of Orientalism, which is frequently reflected as “other” and “taboo” in music, the opera Lakme is fine example of this. He was one of the leading commentators of the complex conflicts in the Middle East. He was also a musicologist, writing many essays and accomplished pianist, but in neither realm was he a professional musician nor musicologist.

The discussions are dynamic starting from the time these men put together an Israeli/Palestinian children’s orchestra, where kids from each background started out by being amazed that others had “classical” musical knowledge, to kids refusing to be stand partners, and eventually creating an orchestra where background, culture and tradition took “second fiddle” to working together to make music. Barenboim and Said then discuss the nature of music and sound creation, the idea that the score is not a piece of music, that that is only realized by the actual performance. They discuss the ownership of music, does it belong to the composer after the final pen stroke or does it then belong to world when it is heard. Furthermore what happens when the performance is over and the sound disappears?

They get into issues of nationality, i.e. the German Sound, and how it is German, yet it is universal. I may not know how to speak German, but as a musician, I can play German music, as well as Italian, French, English, etc etc. So there may be a German music, a German tradition that speaks through Bach to Beethoven to Wagner to Schoenberg, but it is accessible universally. Anyone can hear it.

They get into authenticity, the conservative notion of playing period instruments and how that can be disingenuous because the music itself is fluid, transcending time and able to be played according the reception’s ears and knowledge of today.

All of these things are then expanded into ideas of society, addressing patriotism vs nationalism, history as it relates to fundamental harmony both vertically and horizontally, immigration, taboos, reclamation of sound, prejudice, otherness, enlightenment, mysticism, etc. I have never seen so much intellectual, deep, musical and philosophical ground covered in 186 pages.

This is a book, that while short, takes a long time to read because every word is gold, and the ideas are dense and require unpacking. Although it is presented in musical terms and therefore can be rather inaccessible to those without formal musical training (which they also address as a major concern in this book)  I think it worthwhile for non-musicians to read to begin/continue the critical awareness of the great issues challenging our world.

The following are selected quotes (some with my annotations):

Because the score is not the truth. The score is not the piece. The piece is when you actually bring it into sound.
Barenboim (DB) p. 33

At the beginning tremolo of the Bruckner Fourth or Seventh Symphony, you create the illusion that it starts out of nowhere and that sound creeps out of silence, like some beast coming out of the sea and making itself felt before it is seen. This may sound very poetic and metaphysical, but it is a defiance. In order to defy physical law, you have to understand that physical law and to understand how it is that things sound a certain way and why
DB p. 35

This is an important idea both in music and life. You need the understanding in order to create and/or perceive. You must know how it works if you are to know how you fit.

I don’t think that we have any right to have a sort of generalized criticism, if not hatred, of the people who hated us, because then we descend to the level of those people who persecuted us for so many years.
DB pp. 109-110

Whether it’s Jews hating Germans, Palestinians hating Israelis, United States hating Muslims. The minute we hate others for hating us, we descend to the thought and actions of what we hate, we in essence become what we hate. I said something similar about people celbrating the death of Osama bin Laden. I didn’t celebrate, because I celebrate someone’s life, and his life was not worth celebrating. If I were to celebrate death, I would be no better than what I despise.

The moment a composer like Beethoven has actually finished writing a piece, that piece becomes independent of him. It becomes part of the world. The qualities that he has put in don’t necessarily stay there. So, they can be interpreted or misinterpreted, used or abused, as we have seen in the different political trends too.
DB p. 143

I love this. Music is innocent, composer’s intentions are damned. Example, Reagan using a New York, Gay, socialist Jew’s composition for his “Morning in America” commercials. Reagan stood against almost every ideal Aaron Copland stood for. But Copland’s music became independent of Copland the second he finished composing it. Another example is Kubrick’s use of Ode to Joy in a Clockwork Orange, it no longer is a rapturous piece once you’ve sen the movie. Therefore, the music does not necessarily reflect nor represent his ideas. The Same could be said of Wagner, whose ideas were reprehensible, but does that make his music reprehensible?

That was really hard for me to watch and upload.

THIS one is long but important:

DB: The combination of these two factors – the attitude to the profession beyond the professional and the fact that they have such a thorough musical education – makes each one of them play from the score and not from their part. By this I mean that wherever they play, they are perfectly and consciously aware of what this note that they are playing at that moment actually means in the context. In other words, what is the place of that note: what is the place of that note in the chord; and what is it both vertically and horizontally. And this is a very important factor in music-making, what one would call the vertical pressure of the horizontal discourse. This means the melodic line and rhythm go in a horizontal direction, but there is always a vertical pressure of the chording, of the harmonies, that is constantly there. In this respect, music is exactly like history, which has to be lived both simultaneously and subsequently.

EWS: … this structural wholeness, as you described it, the education of musicians and the way they play in the case of the Staatskapelle, and particularly in Beethoven, is disappearing throughout our society. If you think of the major pressures, intellectual and social, that exist, they are toward greater pragmatism – in other words, specialization of knowledge, so that only fellow experts can understand each other. The moment you step out of a particular field, you can no longer communicate with anyone else… The idea of a common discourse doesn’t exist anymore because, first of all, our training is extremely specialized, and then, the whole funding apparatus is geared toward the fragmentation of knowledge, so that people do more and more about less and less. … there is a certain kind of ideological indoctrination that more or less says, “Well it’s not your problem; someone else will solve it for you; you are no longer responsible for that.” There is a sense, particularly in the United States, that we don’t need to know about the rest of the world. The awareness of the overall society and the destiny of where we are going, whether it concerns the environment, the arts, or history is diminished. For example, in America, history is considered to be what is forgotten, When you say to someone “you’re history,” it doesn’t mean that you’re a part of it; it means that you’re obliterated. That’s what history means. …People are no longer educated that way in music, and certainly not in literature. I know because I’ve been teaching for forty years, and I realize now that young students know less and less. You could take for granted, when I began, that students had been educated… As a teacher, you could assume that they knew there was a body of literature… which began in such and such a way that included great figures like Milton and Shakespeare and Wordsworth and Yeats, and so on. You can’t assume that anymore. There’s a kind of a pursuit of the narrow, the particular, and the specialized. And the result is that there’s a kind of overall battle where it’s very difficult, in discourse or in intellectual exchange, to have …illuminating and liberating moments.
pp. 148-150

I truncated this a bit for brevity, but what Barenboim is getting at is the value of the note and how it fits. The note does not exist in a vacuum, it is necessary for the vertical pressure or harmony, it is there because of what came before and it informs what comes next. I can replace the ‘note’ with the ‘individual’ in relation to that individual’s culture, history, context. We do not exist in a vacuum and we only become useful when we understand how we fit, right now, in context with what came before and what is to come. I’ve actually heard this as the true definition of humility.

Said takes this concept and adds to it a concept that was given a name I heard in a lecture last night. This concept is Moral Malpractice. This idea that once we specialize in something, and we don’t follow up, don’t change if we see our specialized actions not being effective in context, that we unaware of context or rely on someone else to take care of, this is moral malpractice. Said goes on to state that if we continue to live this way, in narrow intellectual bubbles, we end up having no meaningful discourse, and our world becomes more and more fragmented. He, like I, sees that things like common core curriculum and standardized tests are actually not the goal of education, it is teaching people critical thought for themselves that is important, and we can really only get this through the humanities/music.

Either everything is absorbed into this one kind of monochromatic, homogeneous, mindless whole or there’s an active sense of the classic civilization threatened by new forces, the response to which is often, “We have to be careful about the other; the other is dangerous.” And I think that the real problem today is that there’s no mediation between these two extremes. Either there’s homogenization or there is xenophobia, but not the sense of exchange. It’s taking place in many parts of the world. Hence the need to return to origins: you know, people who say, “Let us go back to roots”; the need to find a German past, the Jewish past, the Arab past, the American past. There is a need to find a past that is uncontaminated by anything, even though it’s completely unhistorical, because the past is very much like the present.
EWS pp. 152-153

Yup, fear, the other, the “good old days” myth, fear…. Did I say fear. Xenophobia or assimilate to the Borg.

I believe that when all things are right on the stage – when the playing, the expression, everything becomes permanently, constantly interdependent – it becomes indivisible. And this is the mystical, because this is the same idea of religion, of God: that there’s suddenly something that you cannot divide anymore. The experience of music-making is that, in a way. It’s not religious in the sense that one prays to it, but it’s comparable to religion in the sense that it cannot be divided. And when that actually happens, I believe that the active listener, who is sensitive, can communicate with that. This is what I mean by the mystical.
DB p. 156

Just Beautifully Stated. As close to believing or understanding God as I will ever get.

The attitudes of many Germans who are hostile to foreigners seem to me to derive from the fact that the last two or three generations of Germans have not adequately learned what immigration means. They fail to understand that it is possible to have more than one identity at the same time and to accept that people of foreign origin, with foreign customs and a foreign culture, can become part of one’s own land without their threatening one’s identity as German.
DB p. 172

I challenge anyone to replace the word German with American and deny that it is the truth about Americans who are hostile to immigrants as well.

This was hard to watch too.

If you wish to learn how to live in a democratic society, then you would do well to play in an orchestra. For when you do so, you know when to lead and when to follow. You leave space for others and at the same time you have no inhibitions about claiming a space for yourself. And despite this, or maybe precisely because of it, music is the best means of escape from the problems of human existence.
DB p. 173

Music for the most part is transnational; it goes beyond the boundaries of a nation or a nationality and language. You don’t have to know German to appreciate Mozart, and you don’t have to be French to read a score by Berlioz. You have to know music, which is a very specialized technique acquired with painstaking care quite apart from subjects like history or literature, although I would argue that the context and traditions of individual works of music have to be understood for purposes of true comprehension and interpretation.
EWS pp. 179-180

Politicians can talk their usual nonsense and do what they want, and so can professional demagogues. But for intellectuals, artists and free citizens, there must always be room for dissent, for alternative views, for ways and possibilities to challenge the tyranny of the majority and, at the same time and most importantly, to advance human enlightenment and liberty.
EWS p. 181

Was it dissent?

In the Israeli case about anger and Barenboim, how many writers, musicians, poets, painters would remain before the public if their art was judged by their moral behavior? And who is to decide what level of ugliness and turpitude can be tolerated in the artistic production of any given artist? For a mature mind it should be possible to hold together in one’s mind two contradictory facts: that Wagner was a great artist, and second, that Wagner was a disgusting human being. Unfortunately one cannot have one fact without the other. This is not to say that artists shouldn’t be morally judged for their immorality or evil practices; it is to say that an artit’s work cannot be judged solely on those grounds and banned accordingly.
EWS p. 182

I have, probably insensitively, on many occasions, compared the Wagner conundrum to Michael Jackson, and Phil Spector. Both despicable human beings whom without popular music would not be what it is.

But what about the children?

Yup, direct from a murderer

If you watch nothing else, watch these Israelis and Palestinians play the music of one of the most notorious anti-semites the world has known.

…but the main point has to be that real life cannot be ruled by taboos and prohibitions against critical understanding and emancipatory experience. Those must always be given the highest priority. Ignorance and avoidance cannot be adequate guides for the present.
EWS p. 184

If you have made it this far, you will see why I’m so astounded with this book. It can be found on Amazon or possibly in a library near you. I suggest that you go look it up in WorldCat under the ISBN number of 978-1-4000-7515-7. Worldcat will then direct you to the closest library that has it, or maybe you can access it through your own local library through their inter library loan program (ILL).

Happy Reading

Happy Thinking

Happy Listening

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