Dan Lopata

Live, Love, Listen

Archive for the tag “General”

UPDATED: Why I am voting for a 3rd party presidential candidate and why you may or may not consider doing so yourself.

Go Here for Retraction : Retraction

 

“But you’re wasting your vote,” “Voting third party is a vote for Trump.”

Nope, I live in New York State. Right now Hillary is polling at 50.3% to Trump’s 33.6% in NYS. I can check these polls up to October, and if it changes to the point that Donald is within 5 points of Hillary, I will vote for Hillary. But as it stands, me voting for Hillary now works against my/our best interests of breaking the two-party system.

Now I have a lot of friends saying that if every Democrat in NYS did this then Trump would win NY. First, if we go with that actual hyperbole, if every Democrat voted Green in NYS then Jill Stein would win NY getting all of the Electoral votes in NY and preventing both Trump and Hillary from getting 270. That would be fun! Secondly, what kind of reach and influence do you think I really have? But if that is how you feel, okay, that assures me that my reach and opinion holds little sway and therefore Hillary will win NYS because too many people feel this way. Look, there is a 3 million vote buffer in NYS, do you really think that many democrats understand what getting a third party to 5% of the vote means? I didn’t think so.

But, to appease my friends in Blue States, let me then make the pitch to ALL Democrats and independents in Red States:  ID, MT, ND, SD, WY, UT, KS, TX (Primarily Texas), OK, MO, AR. AK, LA, MS, AL, TN, KY, IN, SC. Look, your vote for Hillary isn’t amounting to a hill(ary) of beans, you’re not beating Trump in those states. All Democrats voting Green in TX, TN, and IN alone would get the Greens to a 5% threshold. Your third party vote wouldn’t be a vote for Trump because you wouldn’t win anyhow; it would be a vote FOR breaking the two-party gridlock. GO OUT AND DO IT!

What about Battleground States? By all means, if you live in NV, AZ, CO, MN, IA, NE, WI, MI, OH, ME, NH, PA, VA, NC, GA, FL vote for Hillary, We can’t afford a Trump Presidency. Particularly if you live in PA, OH, MI, FL. Your third party vote in those states are a vote for Trump, this is bad.

“So you keep talking about this 5% Threshold Dan, what is that all about?”  The Federal Election Commission offers great perks for Political Parties that break this threshold. These include:

Since no third-party candidate received 5% of the vote in the 2008 presidential election, only the Republican and Democratic parties were eligible for 2012 convention grants, and only their nominees were eligible to receive grants for the general election once they were nominated. Third-party candidates could qualify for public funds retroactively if they received 5% or more of the vote in the general election.

So, this is NOT a protest vote. This is not a vote for Trump, and it is not a wasted vote for me. A write in becomes a wasted vote because unless the name is recognized by the federal commission it is discarded (A Bernie write in is a horrendous vote, it means NOTHING). This vote is a vote FOR something, not AGAINST something. This is a vote for viable alternatives to the two-party system which frankly has become a party on the right and another party on the far right.

I think we all can say that we are really fed up with politics as they are. I’ve heard many say that they will stay home because their vote “doesn’t matter” and in non-battleground states this is true for the Presidential election if you only vote Dem or Rep (Not so true about down ticket elections). So here is an opportunity to take on status-quo politics and make your vote matter.

Furthermore, many have said, and I agree, that third parties need to start at the local level then grow. This is true, third parties will be taken more seriously when you see them with records in government from Dog Catcher to Mayor to State Senator to Governor to Congressperson, but part of the effort to get those names and policies seen by voters come from funding at the federal level. This is why getting that national ticket to 5% helps the grass-roots effort of building a viable third party. So yes, I will be also voting down-ticket for people and policies I believe in. To be honest the Greens that have run locally are not good candidates, nor are they always better alternatives to the traditional parties, so I will vote my conscience in these local elections. That does not mean I won’t get involved and not have discussions with the local Greens. I would hope they would run some better candidates because I like their platform.

Also, I’ve heard that Jill Stein is not the best candidate. Let me be clear, I am not voting for the candidate, I am voting for the platform and I am voting for MORE DEMOCRACY by getting more voices in the public square. I do not agree 100% with the Green platform, but I believe it is better than the Democrat’s and the Republican’s platforms, and I believe it is important to have more voices in the process.

The final objection I’ll address is that having a Green Party just distills the Democrats and assures Republicans a win. Not so, It becomes an opportunity for Democrats to adopt planks in the Green Platform thereby eliminating the need for a Green Party. The same can be said on the other side of the equation with a socially liberal Libertarian Party forcing the GOP to adopt its planks. More voices = more democracy and greater representation, no matter how it happens.

So, when you fill out that card in November, I ask you to take a moment to think. Will my vote really matter in stopping Trump, or will I and the nation be better served by voting FOR more  voices in our democracy? The answer will be different for each person based on what you believe and more importantly by geography. I for one would like my NYS vote to mean something for a change.

 

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Unsure

I’m really struggling with the idea of doing more ultras or organized events. This is not because I don’t enjoy them or the community, I love it, but the idea of training for a specific goal, one that I’m unsure that I can achieve is no longer so appealing to me.

I have one big event left on my calendar, Twisted Branch 100k. Between now and then I’m sweeping the Ontario Summit Trail Races (13.1 miles), I’m pacing Ben at Manitou’s Revenge (22 miles), and I’m running the Dam Good Trail Run (14 miles). I’m on board with all of these, but I can’t fathom 18 hours on the Bristol Hills Branch in an event with other people or the training it will take to accomplish it. I’m tired. I don’t feel like I have anything to prove to myself or others, I just want to enjoy time on the trails without the pressure that big events bring.

Currently I’m looking at ADK maps, High Peaks and Northville Placid Trail. I’m looking at the Finger Lakes Trail maps and the Bruce Trail maps (Ontario, CA) and I’m thinking about just hiking; day treks, weekend treks and maybe something a little longer. I just want to explore outdoors.

I am still down with the idea of moving faster than the traditional hiker and going light to ultralite, just because there seems to be more freedom involved and much more of connection and flow with the land. I just need to figure out how to make it happen logistically and temporally; I mean I still have a family and job and music and stuff.

Does this mean I’m giving up running? Absolutely not. I will run for fitness, for social reasons (group runs and such) and for mental / emotional balance, but I think the days of “racing” are over. Will I continue to support events? Yes, events that prove to be environmentally friendly. Will I periodically sign up for an event? Sure, but more likely I’ll volunteer to sweep, as the reason for being at the event is to experience the trail (here’s looking at you Breakneck).

So that’s it. I’m on the fence about Twisted Branch and that decision will ultimately be made later, but by in large I think my racing days are done… until they aren’t 😉

The Year in Review Part I (Athletic Endeavors?)

It’s been an interesting year so I will break this up into a few blog posts (looks like 6 of them):

Part I : My physical body

I DNF’d all of my goal races. At Massannutten Mountain 100M I failed at 70 miles, and evidently did it with a smile on my face. At Twisted Branch 100K I failed at 59 miles, again with a smile on my face.

So clearly my attitude at the time of my DNF’s was good, probably because I wasn’t kidding myself that I was actually ready to complete either of them given the training I put in. But upon review I am quite unhappy with the effort I put forth, and the (non)results of my effort were on display at These events.

This brought me to the point of seriously considering if I was capable of doing these things (ultras) anymore. But, as I look back to 2014’s Cayuga Trails 50 and pics of the runs I did two years ago, I see that I do have that in me.

So what changed? Well, I started a new medication which I will delve into in a subsequent blog post, and I also made tons of excuses. So weight gain happened, cold weather and cry-babiness happened. Many gigs happened (next blog), kids, work, running my own business, etc. etc. etc.

All of that said, the year was not a complete loss. I did a number of sweeping jobs, including the last 25 miles of the last Virgil Crest Ultra. I ran Iron Master Challenge 50k with Amy and crewed her to her first 50 mile finish at Haliburton Forest (site of my only 100 mile finish). Also, Amy and I started a quest to hike the entire Bruce Trail in Ontario Canada. We finished the first 50 miles (82K) in the Niagara Region this past August on our anniversary and are heading up in January to knock out some of the Iroquois section on our meet-aversary. So there’s all of that. Not to mention I did complete the entire Bristol Hills Branch (54 miles) in one day (as part of Twisted Branch) which has been a goal for a few years

So this year… goals remain large, MMT 100 continues to be on the bucket list, and now I also have unfinished business at Twisted Branch. Along the way I hope to run Bull Run Run 50M for my 3rd time but with Amy this time. I plan on pacing the guy I train best with, Ben Murphy, at LOViT 100 M and Manitou’s Revenge this year. And, finally I am aiming to tackle a huge endeavor this coming fall, that will be revealed as plans and the reality of it take shape.

What needs to be different? I need some commitment to the process. My training cycle begins Dec 1st (Tomorrow). I’ve been training myself to wake early and get out because life is still going to happen. The only regular dedicated time I can count on is early mornings. The medication thing doesn’t look like it’s going to change soon, but I am looking to counter that weight gain with diet. Amy and I currently looking at some options. Along with those diet options, I’m going to get back into training my body to metabolize fats instead of relying on carbs, this means I’m looking at the Maffetone method of training. I’m working with a HR monitor and am going to train for the optimal cardio, weight loss, fats as fuel burning results I can. This requires a much slower pace, which will mean more time on feet. Don’t expect me to keep up with y’all at group runs anymore. Looks like sweeping remains my past-time, and not just for events anymore

Beyond that, Amy and I will continue with the Bruce Trail, maybe explore some High Peaks in the Adirondacks, Play on the Finger Lakes trail, maybe attempt the Saranac 6r Challenge with a couple of the kids. These are all just possibilities and some may or may not come to fruition this year. So long as we are sucking air and passing gas, we can continue these things in following years… the mountains aren’t going anywhere.

 

Next up… Music

 

What Are You Made Of?

DNF

3 days out from my second DNF of the year for missing cut-off times at ultras, the question, “What are you made of?” has been running through my mind. Yet it is never a question that runs through my mind while I’m running ultras. I find this curious.

So let’s examine my more recent DNF’s. Last year in September I dropped from doing the Monster Marathon (Full) at the half-way mark, why, because I was tired and didn’t care. Later in October I rolled my ankle at 5 miles and DNF’d the Danby Down & Dirty 20K at the 10K mark, I wasn’t really into that race either. The problem in both of those cases was that my head was not in a place that gave respect to what it takes to complete those races and I quit mentally long before my body quit. I can even say this with regard to Danby because my lack of respect for the course resulted in not taking proper precautions and care of my foot placement; respect that should have been a given knowing this course very well.

This year I DNF’d Massanutten Mountain 100 miler just shy of 70 miles because I missed a cut-off. I was exhausted, couldn’t move fast, my feet were destroyed, and I wasn’t fit enough to go the distance in the time required. All that said, even though I questioned myself at times regarding whether I could go on, I did not leave the course until I was told I had to.

3 days ago, I missed the last aid station cut-off at Twisted Branch Trail Run 100K by just over a ½ hour. I was running into that station, trying to get there and move on. I had enough reserves in the bank to go the extra 6.5 miles but I did not have the time and I was pulled again. During this run I was questioning around the 40 mile mark whether I was capable of pulling off these harder races, and trying to decide whether I should continue attempting them, but I never stopped moving forward (except a few times on climbs to prevent my heart from bursting out of my chest). I think I even pulled one person out of the second to last aid station with me with the minimal/impossible hope of making the last cut-off. I deferred the decision about trying to attempt more of these things until I had some time away from this event.

Now that there has been some time, 3 days, and one recovery run, 3.25 miles, I see that my mind and body are both still working. That actually my mind is stronger now than it was last fall, because it didn’t question the idea of whether or not to move forward even though it was questioning other things. That my body is more durable than I thought, because in comparison to most other runners I know who attempted Twisted Branch I was one of two who actually put together a recovery run yesterday (that I saw) and the other one was the 2nd place finisher.

So last night, while talking to Amy about Haliburton Forest 50 Miler, her first attempt at a 50 coming up in two weeks, we got on the Haliburton board on Facebook and I agreed to pace a 4 time Badwater finisher through the night of the 100M race after crewing Amy for her 50. I am also sweeping the last 25 miles of the hardest 100 miler (Virgil Crest Ultras) in the Northeast US the following weekend. I think I have also determined that I will shoot for the Mendon 50K in November and take it seriously, unlike what I did with Monster and Danby last fall. Because:

right now, that is what I’m made of

These past two DNF’s on the hardest courses I have ever run, showed me a resilience I haven’t seen in myself in a while. It’s a trait I like. They have shown me a mental fortitude that has been lacking in areas and times of my life recently, and I can learn to apply that in other areas. They have shown me unconditional support from a community that celebrates what we do accomplish on a day and helps break down how to do it better the next time. I crave community even though I’m a loud introvert that tends to push people away. Interestingly enough, the inability to finish these last two events have shown me what I have working for me as opposed to what is working against me.

Do I know what I’m going to do next year? Will I attempt MMT100 or Twisted Branch again? I don’t know yet, What I do know is that I won’t shy away from long endurance treks that allow me to be outdoors and allow me to challenge my misconceptions about myself.

What do you have that’s working for you? What are you made of?

The Mountain Moves for No One

You don’t climb mountains without a team, you don’t climb mountains without being fit, you don’t climb mountains without being prepared and you don’t climb mountains without balancing the risks and rewards. And you never climb a mountain on accident – it has to be intentional

~ Mark Udall

mass trail

13 years ago, filled with piss and vinegar, running away from a failed marriage, behaving in unseemly ways that contradict my morals and ethics (which are socially, not religiously bound) I arrived at a mountain certain that I would finish a 103.7 mile footrace on it…

I failed.

Fast forward to May 16th-17th this year, I arrived at the same mountain, with the intention of finishing the 103.7 mile footrace on it. Spoiler alert, I made it just under 70 miles in 24 hours before being pulled from the course…

I succeeded.

Yes, I covered fewer miles this year. Yes, I didn’t achieve the intended outcome. Yes, I still don’t have a buckle from Massanutten Mountain 100 Miler. But I still succeeded.

On May 15th at 6:00 AM Amy and I headed to Massanutten Mountain for my return engagement with Virginia Happy Trails Running Club’s (VHTRC) premiere event. This return engagement was a long time in the making and made possible by a generous scholarship from #TrailsROC, the running club I belong to in Rochester. I don’t just mention #TrailsROC because it is my obligation to as a result of the scholarship, it is because this group and its members are indicative of the larger reason why I consider this outing a success.

Mountain

Yeah, that thing out there that looks like a race profile? That’s where I’m going to run!

Sunshine Road Trip

Amy was coming along because she wanted to crew for me. This alone is a new experience for me, I was nervous because I have never had a crew before, I have always just relied on aid stations and drop bags in the past. This change in behavior was going to be different, I was worried about feeling responsible for my crew, I was worried that Amy was going to take my gruffness the wrong way, I was worried about a change in routine. Some of this was founded and some not. It took some getting used to as I was expecting bottles to be handed to me right as I passed through the first aid station, but waited for them to be brought out of the cooler. Also, I ran right by where Amy had set up shop going into the Elizabeth Furnace aid station because it was before the aid station and I was concerned about getting to the aid station and having my number recorded so I had to walk about 50 yards back to Amy’s set up. And then there was the little dispute about a buff vs. a bandanna. All of that was minor… the actuality of the situation is that I have never had better care and attention through aid stations in my entire ultra career. Amy knows me, she knows when I’m feeling good, and when the wheels are off. She made sure that anything I needed or asked for was at the ready. She got me coffee, chicken broth, socks, shirts, shoes, bandannas, buffs, headlamps, batteries, pepperoni jerky, ginger root, ginger ale, tailwind, trekking poles, mountain dew, turkey sandwiches, pierogis, quesadillas, bacon, water, bag balm, chocolate covered espresso beans, and she made sure that officials knew I was on the course still when they thought everyone had come through……. Just amazing!

Crew

Some Crew tools and supplies

May 16th.

3 AM is an early wakeup call, but it happened, I threw on my #trailsROC shirt, my sleeves, my Northface Nearly Naked Long Haul shorts (which elicited some great comments later as I was pulling little bottles out of hidden pockets all over the place at an aid station), 2-Toms chafing solution (which doesn’t work well if you’re wearing cotton underwear… there’s a lesson learned) SmartWool Socks, NB MT110v2 shoes, Ultimate Directions AK Race Vest with bottles, and a buff. I headed down to the start to check in and they were cranking “Get up, Get on Up” James Brown J Hanging out I got to see fellow #trailsROC runner Yoshi and get his picture with me. The scene is surreal, you have a PVC pipe made start/finish line with a clock counting down to 4:00 AM and tons of people just leisurely sitting in seats under a tent. It wasn’t until 3 minutes of 4:00 that anyone got up to get near the start line, and then promptly at 4:00 AM Kevin Sayers says “go” in the most unassuming start for one of the most epic races ever. I have seen the cannon shot and start at Kona, I have seen the Boston and NYC marathon start, I have felt the immense power of the understated simple “go” at the MMT 100 mile footrace, and it is no less spectacular than any of those others.

Mass Start

OLD SKOOL

Yoshi

Me with the Super-Human Yoshi

Start

and… “go”

I don’t want to get into a play by play here, but I just want to mention that the first four miles of this race is a gentle uphill (600ft) of road. A guy I was running with quipped, “This is Bullshit!” which became quite the code for, “Yup, this is what I signed up for, let’s have fun with it.” Heard it while climbing Short Mountain, heard it while climbing Kern’s Mountain, heard it while descending into Elizabeth Furnace (Where I saw fellow #trailsROC runner and now VHTRC runner Angie K.), even said it while not being able to run the ridge at the top of the climb out of Elizabeth furnace. A bunch of us were having fun with this as we went along.

Angie

Angie K.

We also had a ton more in common, I wish I could count the number of times I heard people talk about that reason we were out there was to grapple with our demons. Not that I actually believe in demons, but I do have issues in my life and my psyche that I grapple with: alcoholism (in remission for 23 years), chronic depression, crippling self-doubt, and anxiety. These come out at the worst times, dealing with work, family, bands, household economics, marriage relationship, socially, politically, etc. One of the things about an ultra of this magnitude is that it is a tangible experience that reveals how wrong I am on so many counts when these “demons” rent space in my head. Part of the reason for this is that they show up during the event, and that happens usually at about 4.5 miles in a stretch of 9 miles without an aid station. What am I going to do? Sit down in the middle of the trail and cry/die because no one is going to lift me out? No, I put one foot in front of the other until I reach the next aid station. Usually around 6 or 7 miles in that stretch I realize that I continued to move forward even when I thought I couldn’t, and realize that my worry, self-doubt demon was just a false thought.

“Tired is not an injury”

Gap Creek

Gap Creek 4:00 AM 5/17. 24 hours and done.

While I had the intention of going the distance, I also realistically knew that it might not happen. I told Ron Herkeens Jr. before the race that the only way to get my off of the course was to pull me off, even if it meant crawling. Mile 54, Habron Gap Aid Station, I was greeted by a volunteer who asked how I was doing, and if I was okay (must have looked dazed after 4 miles of exposed road running from the last aid station (that had guacamole). I just looked at him said, “Yeah, I’m okay, tired is not an injury.” He laughed and said that was the best quote he had heard all day. I had beat the cut-off by about an hour at this point and was told to sit and fuel up for a while because the next climb, Kern’s Mountain, was 2.5 miles and 1300+ feet of climb. So I took some time, changed my shoes, socks and shirt, got a buff, ate some broth, got my trekking poles and set off. Kern’s is really tough, not just because it’s huge but because that four miles of road traversed before climbing it, affords a daunting view of the mountain to stare at. It’s breath taking, not just because of the beauty and anticipation/fear of the climb, but because breath is already gone from traversing 50 miles to this point. But tired is not an injury, and with numerous rest breaks I climbed this thing through the night and traversed this section to Camp Roosevelt with 15 minutes to spare before the cut-off. I didn’t dilly-dally, but I didn’t know that I had another 1000 ft of climb ahead of me, and a steep descent. I missed the next cut off at Gap Creek by 45 minutes, happy, grateful, sad, disappointed, proud, humbled, basically every emotion I own except one, the one that is my truest demon, the one that dogs my every step every day… Anger. There was no anger. THIS IS THE SUCCESS.

It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves.

~ Sir Edmund Hillary

What did me in? My feet which were blistered pretty badly and in pain with each step. I was exhausted, there was no gas left in my tank, even though I fueled and hydrated really well. Basically out of the quote at the beginning of this piece, I was not fit. I can blame all sorts of things for this: long cold winter, rolled ankle in October that never completely properly healed, job/family constraints, new medication… but those are just excuses, the real reason is that I didn’t devote enough time to my fitness. I am 20 lbs heavier than I was last year when I ran Cayuga Trails 50. I have not been paying any attention to diet, which I never do. I have rationalized all of my missed workouts away. But as Steve Prefontaine said, “A man can fail many times, but he isn’t a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.” I have myself to blame for not finishing.

But of my success the reality is because I have so many incredible people around me, my life is completely different than it was 13 years ago, I am not finished with this event by any stretch of the imagination, I did not quit.

Rock

My demon is not the DNF, nor the rock that goes with it, my demon was/is my anger that does not allow me to see the beauty. The voice that says I’m not fast enough, I’m not good enough, nobody likes me, I’m a second-rate bass player, I’m not an asset to ROCSPOT… this is the voice that obscures the vision that sees: the community of #trailsROC, and Oven Door Runners, the community of my Soul Matters group at First Unitarian, the community of ex-drunks and druggies that infiltrate all areas of my life (work, music, First U, running), the community of my family, my kids, my incredible ultra-babe wife, the community of like-minded scientists and activists in ROCSPOT. This is the voice that obscures the vision of the beauty of the trail, the vista at the top of the climb and during the climb, the ridiculous finds of neat notes buried in old books at Sibley Music Library, the thrill of being a part of helping Rochester out of energy poverty and hopefully economic poverty, the smile in my wife’s face, the achievements of my oldest, youngest and in-between children. For a moment, for 24 hours, this demon was slayed.

And that is the magic of the mountain. It doesn’t care, it is just going to stand in my way and everyone else’s way and knock us down until we find a way up and over in order to see that incredible vista of all the things surrounding us and supporting us.

I’ll be back. Will I finish? I hope so. Does it matter? Yes, but not as much as all of the things I find along the way, and hopefully give back.

I owe so much to this one:

ultrababe

ULTRABABE (Yeah, I’m with her!)

A few more pics, all pics are courtesy of Amy Lopata:

Yoshi run

YOSHI!

First Aid

Edinburg Gap 12.1 miles in

Elizabeth

Elizabeth Furnace about 50K into the race

Stats and splits can be found here at Strava.

Training Derailed – The Trail to MMT 100

Yeah, so two posts ago I mentioned, “training plans are basically suggestions.” To prove my point, I threw mine out the window this week. Last week I was on target, running my 6 miles on Tuesday, 5 on Wednesday, another 6 on Thursday then gearing up for 14 on Saturday. But, I got a sinus infection and a really nasty head cold. Combined with that, the kids had to be everyway, everywhere, everytime over the weekend and I had three gigs from Friday night through Saturday night. Thus my weekend long run plans were screwed.

Justifying my lack of getting out there I tallied up my time on feet playing gigs from Friday to Saturday and it totaled 10.5 hours, enough in my mind to equal the 20 miles I was supposed to cover from Saturday to Sunday.

Sunday I was laid up, Monday I was laid up, Tuesday I intended to go 14 trying to play catch up and I chickened out, but this morning I regrouped with the Wed AM trailsroc crew, and plugged in a nice and easy 5K.

So this is what happens frequently to me, I miss some time due to circumstances, I look at my plan and I formulate ways to play catch-up. This is a BAD idea. So I missed some mileage, does that make it necessary for me to get an injury? The next thing that happens is I take my idea for making up the mileage and say “I’m going to run 14 on Tuesday,” Tuesday rolls around, it’s raining and I’m scared that I don’t have the fitness level needed to go 14, and think “what if I hurt myself?” I then opt to watch TV and get another big fat 0 in the books (not even the 7 planned on my schedule). So I think, “Yes, Wed AM trailsroc crew is running from the start of the 0 SPF course, I’ll meet up with them and then when they turn at 1.5 miles I’ll run to the 7 mile turnaround and get my 14! This plan is AWESOME!”

Wednesday morning rolls around, and it’s 5 AM, and I think, “what am I, stupid?” But because I told Ben Murphy that I’d see him in the morning, I’m committed to at least showing up. So I go, get my 3.3 miles in (.8 miles short of 1500 miles for the year, so maybe I’ll go out later… I say knowingly that I won’t) and feel great. I realize that my fitness level (which is still at a low point) after 5 days off, has not really suffered, that I can plug some more miles in later today possibly and get my 7 in tomorrow then be ready for 16 on Saturday, and it’s all really okay that I didn’t get the miles in. I don’t need to make them up. I have over five and a half months to get ready for this event and this is no big deal. It would be a big deal if I continued to talk myself out of running by continuing to talk myself into some stupid plan to make up lost time. And, this is where the importance of groups, training partners and accountability come into play for me.

Sunrise

If it weren’t for trailsroc’s Wed AM crew and my word saying that I’d be there, I might have just slept in this morning and taken another goose egg for the day. But it’s these people that carry me when I can’t carry myself, and they do it because I have committed myself to them; to be there to lead or co-lead when Ben has another obligation, to share in the sunrises (when they come back, hopefully in three or so weeks), to review our races, and share in each other’s running and personal victories and failures. These are my people, and when I’m running with them it is less about training and more about community, and yet it IS ultimately about training, because they get me back on track.

I love long solo runs, I think I am an introvert with a vocal exterior that I use as a shield. But I also love group runs, as they remind me that I’m not the only one who enjoys long solo runs. There is a spirit amongst like-minded people, people whom I may not agree with politically, or musically, or religiously, but the like-minded love of the outdoors, of using our bodies to move through the environment and become part of it, and the sheer enjoyment of our surroundings pulls us together. Something about the base simplicity of foot against dirt levels the playing field and makes all of the other things of life insignificant. We are all just humans moving from point A to point B in the simplest, purest way, and that reduces us all to being nothing greater or less than being human.

I like it, and suspect you do too.

A big shout out to trailsROC for being the community that keeps me and many others moving with relentless forward progress.

5 Miles on Wednesday Morning… or Am I Really a Humanist? (The Trail to MMT100)

Vonnegut

I’m actually not a fan of human beings, they are so destructive. A friend of mine has started a new running company with a mission of people first, environment second and profit third, and while I think his aims are commendable I think the priorities are out of order, I think the environment should be first and people second. But really, it’s hard for me to even say that, because if we were really putting people first, we would inherently putting the environment first as people do not live in a vacuum. When we destroy ourselves either through global warming or nuclear annihilation, we will all be gone, but you know what will remain? Yup, the earth will still be here, and better off that we are not.

The AHA (American Humanist Association) defines humanism:

Humanism is a progressive lifestance that, without supernaturalism, affirms our ability and responsibility to lead meaningful, ethical lives capable of adding to the greater good of humanity.

I suppose I can get behind this statement, and there are other interpretations and definitions that talk about how reason, experience, science, and the environment from local environments to the universe affect our experience as humans. I also understand this, but I find it all far to human-centric, like we are the most important thing in the universe, and that is where I question if I am a true humanist, because I don’t believe we are.

Other than thinking about how out of shape I am and how overdressed I was during my 5 mile run this morning, this was the topic that I mused on.

Part of the reason I think about this question is that when it is just me and the trail, far away from humanity, I see what else the world has to offer and how insignificant humanity is. I am surrounded by trees that are far older than me, I watch the cycle of life with fat squirrels gathering nuts and getting ready for winter, and deer getting their winter coats. I see the leafless trees seal off their branches to conserve water through the winter, and I watch the streams and ponds freeze over and realize there is still life teaming under the surface.

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And even though we continue to pollute this world, contribute to global warming, cause the extinction of plant and animal species, lop off the top of mountains to grab coal, and explode oil rigs in the ocean, I am convinced that life will prevail long after we have killed our own species. This actually falls right in line with natural selection; when the genetic makeup of our beings is no longer able to support us in the environment that we have created we will cease to exist and the genetic makeup of species that have mutated in order to live in that environment will prosper. So in the words of George Carlin, “The Planet is fine, the people are f@cked.” And so I present his routine:

Okay, after watching that I think I’m a humanist after all, one of those self-centered white liberals who doesn’t like plastic, but that’s because I think it’s an eyesore;  one of those do-gooders that cares about the bees and the whales because I do want to live in my own little perfect habitat. But isn’t that just the nature of being human? I am self-centered, and when I’m not self-centered I’m still usually human centered doing service for other human beings. But I am most at peace (which is self-centeredly my greatest concern, ironic huh?) when I do service to nature, cleaning up trails, and observing what the world/universe has to offer that is not of human concern. At the same time, just like establishing National Parks and ecological habitats, I think these self-same environmental actions are what is best for humanity, and therefore humanist actions.

5 miles alone in the woods certainly helps with perspective. And, the answer to the question… I’m still not sure.

P.S. The idea of the earth defending itself with viruses is just one way it does it, another way it does it is through cloud cover and global warming when we keep extracting and burning the resources in the earth.

Ankle – Ugh! (The Trail to MMT100, Day 2)

Started the day at the General Practitioner’s reviewing some medication I’m on. I brought up the fact that I still have swelling in my ankle 8 weeks later and she is sending me to ortho, but not without mentioning that I should move on from running. Whatever.

8 weeks, it has been 8 weeks since I rolled my ankle at Danby Down and Dirty, and it’s still swollen. I’ve been told it could be ligament damage by a chiropractor, and like I said in my last post I am skeptical about the efficacy of chiropractic. Oh well, maybe orthopedics will help, I want to make sure that those doctors understand that not running is not an option.

Later in the day I went to the Chiropractor and she said she also would recommend ortho. So after getting Ben Gay on my back and getting it cracked for $4 (thanks Obama!) I went home and gathered up Amy for an Easy 6 at Mendon Ponds.

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At the Water Tower (Mendon Ponds, photo credit Amy Lopata)

I intended to walk quite a bit of this workout, but after 1 ¼ miles my ankle was loosening up, so I kept a slow and steady pace while walking all of the uphills and minding where I placed my left foot. By the time we got to Post Meadow Speedbump, a nasty little hill with incredibly steep grade, I ran most of it. So all in all, I am quite happy about this run.

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Post Meadow Speed Bump (photo credit Amy Lopata)

On a side note, and maybe I’ll do a separate post about this, the topic of trail stewardship came up in my Facebook feed today. I am of the opinion that race organizers and events should follow this formula:
1. Good stewardship
2. Servicing the runners
3. Profits way way down the list.

If you can’t do number one, don’t do the event. If you can’t do number two, you won’t do the event more than once. If you focus on number three to the detriment of number one and number two, expect to be called out by people like me.

All that said, my disappointment today lies in the fact that there are spray paint markings on rocks on our trails and there are still non-biodegradable plastic flagging hanging in the trees from a Zombie event put on in October. This race was put on by an event company called groundassault.com events, and Fleet Feet Sports of Rochester also sponsored this event. I do my best not to mention organizations I have problems with opting rather to let my silence speak for itself while building up organizations I do respect, but I think it is necessary sometimes to educate people on what NOT to do by using specific examples. This event focused on profit above all else ($75 entry on race day for a 5k) and their presence is still hanging in the trees.

Please support groups that support the trails.

They are easy to spot, they are the ones who do trail maintenance days, have caps on trail events that are far below what the DEC, city, or county allows, and have people diligently cleaning up after their events directly following those events. Some regional groups that are great at this are trailsROC, Red Newt Racing, Goose Adventure Racing, Genesee Regional Off-Road Cyclists, Trail Methods, Medved Running Outfitters, Finger Lakes Running Club, The Rochester Orienteering Club, the guys putting on the Twisted Branch Trail 100K run, and Finger Lakes Running & Triathlon Company to name a few. Support these folks, they care.

Live, Love, Listen

Live More, Love More, Listen More

I make no promises about keeping up the blog, it’s nice to have the receptacle but, as you can see, last year I went like gang-busters writing about running, until I stopped. I would blame it on the stress-fracture, but the writing stopped before that happened so I can only blame it on me. This year I hope to write more, and I hope what I write is of interest to people. I will do my best to tag things and categorize things correctly so people won’t get stuck weeding through Ultramarathon training logs if what they are interested in is musings on music, nor do I want people who are interested in my politicoreligiophilosophizing to get bogged down in the Ramones (although this will be harder as when I write about the Ramones it tends to relate to politicoreligiophilosophizing.)

So here it is in a nutshell. 2014:

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Running Plans last year were cut short when I came up injured following (or probably prior to) the BPAC 6 hour run on asphalt. Lessons learned, I’ve cut way back on my schedule and am currently only entered in two races/events: June –  Cayuga Trails 50 which is the USATF 50 mile National Trail Championship; and August: 0 SPF ½ Trail Marathon which is the USATF Niagara Trail Championship. Thinking about some Autumn Possibilities, but leaving those plans until I accomplish at least the first goal. I will widget my workout stuff through this blog.

In addition to my regular Saturday gig with Orange Sky at First Unitarian of Rochester, I am working on a band idea with an old friend/excellent vocalist. This project is in the vein of 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s blues/swing/jazz/rockabilly music. Currently it is a hodgepodge of great musicians getting together and feeling each other out, but I envision a band with moveable parts to accompany the vocal styling of aforementioned friend. I’m not naming names as of yet because I want it solid enough to gig before letting go of that information. I will however drop hints as I have a sax player affiliated with Rochester’s best “worldbeat” group, a guitarist who basically built the 90’s post-post-punk scene in Rochester, and a vocalist who plays saw and banjo and who has performed blues, rock-a-billy, and americana. Hold on to you hats, this is one dynamite group in the works.

Love More:

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2013 was a year of fighting – fighting before I even entered the ring. I approached everyone and everything as a conflict and approached life in metaphorical plate mail. While I was protected from “harm” there was no room for any good to come in, nor room for any good to go out. This year the journey began back in September when I reconnected with the organization largely responsible for my ability to be chemical free for 22 years now; I was also invited to play with Orange Sky, the house band for Saturday Evening services at first Unitarian Church of Rochester. This particular institution, First U,  allows me to remain the skeptic/atheist/humanist that I am but also provides a community to interact with. In this blog specifics will remain vague as the groups I’m involved with require trust, so the insights presented will be only those things that apply to me and names will be omitted or changed to protect the innocent J. How does this fall into “Love More”? My belief in a power greater than myself is that everything is interconnected; I am part of a power greater than myself and that power is part of me as well. The way I garner a relationship with it is through relationships with other people. I believe the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and the more I am in communion with that whole the more I have to offer, and the more comes back. So these relationships are built on me being open, vulnerable, connecting at points of commonality, giving the benefit of the doubt, and understanding that I will get hurt but that’s better than living in isolated fear. I believe these things can be done while holding onto principals that are dear to me, and knowing that when I fight on divisive principals that I am less likely to change others’ hearts and perspective (or my own for that matter) than if I meet others at a place of commonality. This is partly what I mean by “Love More”. It has to do with relationships.

Note: I love running, and I love music, so these things will be included as well.

Listen More:

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Being an ensemble musician, listening is the most important thing I can do. I need to know where I fit; I need to understand the style, the mechanics, the pocket, the groove, the aesthetic, the interpretation etc. in order for me to be most effective for the benefit of the whole.

“Listen More” extends beyond music, it is understanding what I’m reading when I’m reading; it is listening to the aches and pains of my body and acting appropriately; it is watching my son have trouble getting up in the morning and determining what it is he’s really saying; it is hearing the needs, anxieties, joys, triumphs, and failures of my wife and understanding when I only need to listen or when I can offer assistance; it is carving out time to listen to a whole Opera or Symphony, not just the greatest hits (Actually thinking about sitting down with Wagner’s Ring Cycle this year).

“Listen More” requires being PRESENT. It is mindfulness; it is sitting – here – now.

So there it is – no real specific resolutions. No weight loss target; no goal time for races/events; no going to get a specific job (although I am still working on my business, and looking for work); no quitting coffee or going vegetarian… If those things occur, they will merely be fringe benefits of living, loving, and listening more this year.

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